Get Ahead of the Curve and Best Prepare for The LSAT Exam

Get Ahead of the Curve and Best Prepare for The LSAT Exam

If you’re applying to law school, it’s likely that the LSAT is one of the things you’ll need to prepare for. Experts consider it the best predictor of how students will perform once they enter law school. 

When you’re preparing to take the LSAT exam, it can be hard to know exactly what you should focus on or how to study properly in order to maximize your chances of getting into law school. 

To get ahead of the curve, here are a few tips on how to best prepare for this challenging exam. 

1. Schedule Your Preparation

If you are preparing to take the LSAT exam, it is quite possible that you have finished high school for some time now. So, it is best to first start with revising your academic syllabus. You can also take several online tests with LSAT practice questions

It is recommended to start your preparation early even if your test isn’t scheduled for the next 6 months or so. There are some useful approaches you can take to get ready beforehand. You can review a few practice questions from previous years’ LSATs to have an idea of the questions you’ll be answering. 

There are some drills available online that you can practice to improve your math and analytical skills. 

2. Take Practice Tests Early

As mentioned earlier, it’s never too early to start preparing. Start by taking practice tests early and most often. Taking a practice test can be like warming yourself up for what’s coming ahead. It can make you more prepared mentally.

We recommend practicing your test-taking skills with online quizzes. There are plenty of resources out there if you’re looking for something that suits your needs better. One good thing about these quizzes is that they don’t take up much time. Just 30 minutes once or twice a week will do the trick. 

Moreover, you can also take some psychometric tests to have a comprehensive overview of your capabilities. 

3. Practice Answering Questions Quickly

LSAT exams measure your understanding of reading comprehension, grammar, and math. Be sure to record your time when you practice. Practice answering questions quickly. Working under pressure will improve your response time since LSAT is a time-limited test. 

Try to complete as many problems as possible within the given time limit in order to be better prepared for the test day. If you are struggling with a problem, move on to another question. 

During the test, it’s not worth spending too much time trying to solve a problem if it’s taking up valuable time that could be spent solving other questions. 

4. Go Slow to Go Fast

LSAT preparation can be overwhelming and get on your nerves. The most effective way to stop overthinking it is to start early enough. But how early enough? It depends on your pace and capabilities. 

However, a good rule of thumb is to start five to six months before. This way, you will be able to go through your syllabus slowly but thoroughly. 

To ace this test, ensure to make a plan. Whether it’s every night after dinner or just an hour per day. Find out what works best for your schedule. Plan out how much time each subject will take each week so that you’re not scrambling at the end trying to figure out how many hours a week go into testing preparation. 

 5. Learn the Format of the Test

It is important to know the format of the test before you start preparing for it. The LSAT is divided into five sections that are rotated each time you take the test. 

the Format of the Test

Source: https://manoa.hawaii.edu/undergrad/pac/law/law-school-entrance-exams/

The first four sections are one hour long with one 10 to 15-minute break following the third section. Section 5 consists of logical reasoning questions and lasts for 35 minutes with no break after it because this part is always at the end of the exam. 

6. Study Everything You Need to Know

It can be daunting to feel like you’re walking into a test completely blind. That’s why you must gain at least some information before the exam day. Start by revising your academic syllabus, as most of the questions will be related to what you have already read in the high school curriculum.

After you have crammed all your syllabus, it’s time to take an online diagnostic exam that simulates what the actual test will be like. 

You won’t know all of the questions and topics covered in this type of pre-exam, but it can give you a sense of what you will experience in the exam hall. It is also a good way to tell where your strengths and weaknesses lie. 

As mentioned earlier, a major portion of the LSAT consists of logical reasoning. Online practice exams will also help you build your analytical and logical skills before you appear in the exam. 

Author

  • Roxanne Libatique

    Roxanne is currently a journalist at Insurance Business New Zealand and NZ Adviser.She graduated with a degree in Communication from De La Salle University and worked as a journalist for an international news site before joining Key Media. In her freelance work, she contributed articles to one of the leading publications in the Philippines. She also organised events and copy edited content for non-profit organisations.She now writes news for today’s sophisticated commercial insurance, mortgage, and financial professionals in New Zealand.

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